Learning Hawaiian: First Impressions

A few days ago (four days ago, to be exact), I had grown significantly burned out from studying languages of Fiji and Rotuman proved to be a heavy challenge for me with even the most basic level seemingly out of reach (as things stand).

I decided I needed a break from my routine of having my studies of Fijian eat up any gains any of my other weaker languages would have had. I yearned for something more, a language that didn’t feel like it was a “chore” or an “obligation”. I tried to improve Kiribati and Burmese but I sort of “wasn’t feeling it” for either…not right now, at least.

Then, after having a feeling that I couldn’t shake, and a certain infatuation with a language I haven’t felt in a wrong time, I knew I made the right choice when I began to study Hawaiian (as of four days ago).

I do remember my promise to not learn any new languages for 2018. Well, the promise was to not learn any language not related to business, travel or romance. But as a game designer and someone who hasn’t played the seventh generation of Pokémon games yet (set in “Alola”, heavily inspired by Hawaii), I’m going to need to play through the games with some knowledge of Hawaii / the Hawaiian Language first. After all, I’m also designing a game set in a real world location and I’d like to see what Nintendo / Game Freak / the Pokémon Company do(es) well.

Hawaiian fit the bill. After Fijian (which I’m continuing to improve), Hawaiian seems more approachable with the sentence structure and many aspects of grammar no longer foreign at all.

What is odd, however, is the fact that there are so few letters. 13 letters (one of which is the glottal stop “ ‘ “, known as the “ ‘okina”). So “credit card” would be “kāleka kāki”. Personal names are also localized as well, and many traditional English names familiar to most Americans have been morphed into something not even remotely recognizable (Fijian had more letters so it didn’t really have this problem).

I really admire the community of Hawaiian speakers for bringing this language so far with communities and harnessing technology in every sector. I can imagine that, despite the fact that it is still listed by UNESCO as “severely endangered” (It is the least safe language in Google Translate, I believe), Hawaiian will continue to survive and proliferate contrary to all expectation.

Upon hearing speakers from universities and schools speak, they don’t speak of Hawaiian as “dying” but rather in a constant surge of revival. It seems that, from the sheer looks of it, that Hawaiian speakers seem to be more hopeful about the future of their languages than, let’s say, Icelanders would be about theirs (that said, I think that the reports of Icelandic’s “decline” are heavily exaggerated).

Hawaiian, unlike many other languages of the Pacific, has a TON of resources to learn and, I would imagine, many ways to find speakers in New York City and many other places. The amount of loan words founds in English from Hawaii is staggering (luau, kahuna, hula, wiki, etc.) The idiomatic similarities it has with Fijian also make it a lot less stressful experience and a more enjoyable one. I can imagine that future languages from Oceania will come with ease to me.

I should also say that, at this point, it seems that my true language “loves” lie with Oceania, Scandinavian and the Jewish Languages (not also to mention languages of my heritage like Hungarian, which I sadly haven’t been focusing on as much as I could have been but I was sidetracked by Fijian for travel reasons quite early into 2018. Late 2018 will get Hungarian handled, this I promise.)

I also can’t keep on picking up new languages forever and maintenance is already starting to become an issue. That said, perhaps I need to be more inventive and hopeful and silence voices in my mind telling me that I can’t. Or I need to think more deeply about what I want.

That said, at the very least 2018 brought me Fijian. It seems that Fiji Hindi (a small amount), Hungarian, and maybe Hawaiian and Kiribati can also be mine by the time 2019 comes in. Maybe deep improvements in Greenlandic and Lao as well. If I try. I had a long list of languages that I wanted to improve or at least sample in 2018, but with several new games coming out this year and changes in my life it doesn’t seem likely.

That said, I encourage you to follow your dreams in any capacity you can. Your life belongs to only you and you deserve your best shot. End of story.

kanaka maoli

The Darker Sides of Hyperglotism

2018 has had its share of victories for me so far, but sadly it also resulted it a huge series of rude awakenings.

For one, especially after the Polyglot Conference and my growing presence online, I’ve felt my inbox flooded with people asking for learning advice and resources and many other things. I am very grateful for that, in a sense, but to some degree I feel overwhelmed because the day is not far off when I will get WAY too many messages for me to deal with.

I started this blog and became a teacher because I know that the contemporary world is full of pain (as has, most likely, all of human history to date). Contemporary marketing thrives on insecurity, building up limiting beliefs and convincing people that their dreams are out of reach.

I know how it feels to be confused and without hope, and I hope that my writings have brought at least a little bit of healing to the world.

On the other hand, since this year started, there have been a number of difficult happenings. I woke up on morning to find an entire thread on Reddit devoted to hating me with every imaginable awful thing said about me (they linked to my blog and that’s how I found out about it). Thankfully the moderators got involved (perhaps a bit too late) and doled out warnings and deleted the thread (sort of) but the damage still lingers in my heart, despite some apology messages I got.

Anti-Semitism has also entered as well in ways I don’t want to describe. Suffice it to say that, while being Jewish has largely been a source of advantage and comfort for me nowadays rather than either a social liability / point of discrimination / source of guilt, it has been used against me….especially in private messages from complete strangers who don’t hold back.

Unlike in previous years, I find myself in a permanent spotlight. I can’t live a private life anymore, even if I wanted to. But this is what I wanted for years and it is surprisingly stressful when I got it.

I have to be aware that every interaction I have with anyone ANYWHERE has the potential to be used for me or against me. I have to keep my fluent languages in even better shape.

This ties into another thing: I’ve been focusing a lot more on my fluent languages than I have on ones I’d like to know. Part of me wishes it were otherwise, but I also fear that I am suffering from burnout as well.

Thankfully earlier this year I also became a video game tester as well so that has been something new, exciting and quite fulfilling. But if you’re expecting that a job like that is “play games and get paid”, you’re not exactly right. (A lot of the games can be extremely frustrating and you have to take detailed notes on what does or doesn’t work).

Earlier this month I said I was working on Kiribati and Rotuman, but I gave up on improving Kiribati after the first day (for now, at least). I’ll come back to it another day, perhaps one in which I haven’t suffered from so much “Oceania fatigue” (Rotuma is different given that it will likely come of use in Fiji, however slim the chances, and if it blossoms into something to write about I can’t lose that chance).

I constantly feel as though I need to maintain ALL of my projects PERFECTLY AT ALL TIMES, in a twisted perfectionism that has left me confused. I find myself wondering if the good fortune I’ve had so far is something I even deserve, and doubting my successes is another thing I do with unfortunate consistency.

One day I think I will no longer be vexed by this “new state of things”. But much like adjusting to a new reality, as I had too many times throughout my life (going to an Orthodox Jewish Day school for the first time, entering an inner-city high school from there and then Wesleyan University and then four other countries FOLLOWED BY a confused return to my homeland which didn’t seem as though it was mine anymore) will take a lot of difficulty at the beginning, followed by (what I hope can be) some variety of solace.

The Fijian and Fiji Hindi recordings are almost ready, I just need to compile and upload them!

Do YOU relate to anything that I’ve described here? Go ahead and let us all know!

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5 Types of People Who You Should NOT Take Language Learning Advice From

Happy 1st of May! Don’t be confused by the title, this is actually an article filled with encouragement for YOU! Hope your resolutions are going by okay!

Come to think of it, it actually isn’t the PEOPLE themselves but rather their MINDSETS, which are always subject to change (and yes, I do mean always!).

The general rule is this: believe those who want to help you up, and don’t believe those who want to push you down.

However, it can also occur to me that, sometimes, I myself may have written or said something that you may have construed as discouragement or the like. I will say that it is NEVER, EVER my intention to express anything less than “all human beings deserve fulfilled dreams”.

Sometimes there are people who, due to some circumstances, may be wounded or otherwise having a hard time. They may also be blinded on behalf of a belief system (and not just religious ones, mind you) that may prevent them from thinking in any other ways.

To celebration 1/3 of 2018 being over, let’s take note of some variety of opinions you should watch out for:

  1. People Who Focus on What You HAVEN’T Done (Vs. What You HAVE Done)

 

I remember when I was in the Orthodox Jewish Day school of Hard Knocks, I was feeling insufficient, doubtful and overall extremely insecure (this was in my early teenage years, by the way).

The reason? A lot of the teachers were getting me to think about what I WASN’T doing to be a good Jew vs. what I WAS doing.

By contrast, the people at my local minyan in rural Connecticut as well as my rabbis here in New York DO actually tell me that, despite my spiritual failings and any hardships / sins I may have gathered, that I actually am a good person because of the work I’ve done for the proliferation of my own Jewish heritage as well as healing in the world.

As a language teacher I focus on what my students have BUILT UP vs. what they don’t have yet.

An example of this: someone who compares a language you’ve learned in adulthood to that of a native speaker (in an unfair light). Another example: someone who puts down your language abilities on account of one mistake. (The latter is significantly rarer).

 

  1. People Who Adjust Goalposts Arbitrarily

 

One very toxic YouTube personality, within the same video, said that YouTuber X was not a real polyglot because he didn’t do any work in field linguistics with languages with no written form…followed by saying that YouTuber Y was wasting time because he was focusing on rarer languages from the developing world.

Another person tried to accuse me of claiming fluency while knowing only a few sentences of the language. Presented with evidence to the contrary, he proceeded to call me a bunch of names and told me that I didn’t understand how “hard it is” to learn a language. (If you know only how to speak only in insults and diatribes, I bet not only learning a language would be hard but literally everything else in your life).

There is no way to reason with such people. They only seek to infuse self-doubt into the people enjoying the success they wish they were having. And they can have it. But only with changing a toxic mindset. Luckily, this can come easily.

 

  1. People Who, Without Proof, Say That You Haven’t Accomplished What You Actually Have

 

I’m certified in multiple languages (Yiddish, Hebrew and Danish) and I teach nearly nine others. Someone who tries to tell me that I only know how to speak English? Disregard. Someone who tries to tell me that my teaching business is a scam? Disregard. Someone who tries to tell me that I didn’t learn all of these languages when there are videos of me using them? Disregard.

You should ask no less of yourself.

 

  1. People Who Invest More Negative Energy in Their Writing and Speaking Styles than Positive Energy

 

In playgrounds for children there are the variety of kids who want to cooperate and help other people build things and have a good time. There are others that want to destroy the fun for everyone else, perhaps out of boredom or some other negative emotions. (I’ve been both kids, so I know how it feels).

There are people who have an aura of bitterness and pessimism throughout, and this can be especially true on the internet. Some people can’t even bring themselves to say anything positive. Don’t try to get them to. Instead keep on playing and building sandcastles.

 

  1. Anyone Who Discourages You from Following Your Dreams

 Yup. Even if that anyone happens to be myself.

Ever since I graduated from college I decided I would adopt a new rule for my life: this is my life and my dream, and I do what makes it possible. Those who are willing to support me – I will actively seek their company and provide them with support. Those who seek to discourage me in any form – I will distance myself from them, until they learn to do otherwise.

This is your life. You are the hero/ine. You will be a legend to be remembered to whatever degree you want to. Don’t let anyone else take that from you.

 

News:

 

I’ll be focusing on Kiribati and Rotuman for May 2018. The Fijian and Fiji Hindi videos should be up in about a week. I’m still thinking about how to do the “cover” of Ari in Beijing’s “Fail to Win” video. It’ll be on its way!

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Which Mindsets Do Hyperpolyglots Tend to Have?

A friend of mind recommended that I write this piece when he asked me how on earth I managed to live a multilingual life at a young age. Granted, I do have some advantages. Living in New York City means that I have opportunities to hear and use these languages. Being a freelancer that works with translation and teaching has as well (although this does tend to benefit the languages that I have the strongest command in above all). Then, of course, there is my peer group.

If you want to have any mental or professional attribute, surround yourself with people who have it and you’re more than likely to acquire it yourself.

With that said, I also think that anyone can learn 10+ languages to very high levels as long as one crushes any limiting beliefs or any hint of “I can’t!”. History was never changed by people who had this sort of thought.

Here I’ll lay out the variety of mindsets that my hyperpolyglot peers and myself have adopted:

 

  • An Altruistic Desire to Help One Another

 

The best language learners help each other up. They share tips and are willing to rehearse languages whenever necessary and provide feedback / praise / constructive criticism. They draw other people to them with the power of thinking “you can do it!” and “I’m willing to help you!”

They cultivate an openness that is likely to draw in speakers of their target language as well as similar “bridge builders”. They’re willing to provide advice of any sort and provide whatever courage needs to be provided with nary a hint of any toxicity or discouragement at all.

This is NOT saying that hyperpolyglots are angels, because all of us have flaws as human beings. Rather that they see the value in spreading positive energy in encouragement.

 

  • A Growth Mindset

 

Contemporary educational systems tend to focus a lot more on the “fixed mindset”, in which only the current result is judged in ADDITION to ignoring the fact that it is very possible for human beings to improve, even drastically so.

Often on the Internet a lot of people judging people’s language abilities judge what they HEAR and SEE, as opposed to what it WAS and what it has the POTENTIAL TO BE.

Hyperpolyglots see the potential to growth in everything and foster that path in others.

 

  • A Distinct Lack of “Perfectionist Paralysis”

 

I think it was Benny Lewis that coined this term.

When I upload my Fiji Hindi recordings next week or so, there are probably a LOT of things that I got wrong. There is a chance that I may have used too many English loan words or that my formality may be completely off.

That said, I’m going to upload them anyway, even at the cost of potential dislikes. This idea of “waiting until you’re perfect” or, even worse, assuming that anything less than near native fluency is useless, is dangerous.

A lot of today’s institutions as well as common mindsets try to make people adverse to risk. This only serves to breed conformity (which is helpful for the proliferation of income inequality). Always try with what you have, because those form the steps which will lead you to the legendary skills of your dreams.

 

  • An Awareness that Learning a Language is a Very Vulnerable Act and that People Don’t Undertake It Precisely Because of That

 

There is a lot of negative energy in the world, not also to mention many people having heard horror stories about language learning. Some of them include, for example, a man who got a Mandarin Chinese tone wrong and was told by his in-laws to “never attempt this language again” as well as a Dutchman who said “I’d rather speak in English rather than listen to your shit Dutch”.

Half of my language-learning classes at the very beginning is programming people to have my mindset in which to not be afraid of mistakes and realize that even the “pickiest” of native speakers are usually very forgiving.

There is a huge veil of doubt, discouragement and limiting beliefs that prevents people from living their dreams. Every day. We all, as humans, have to get rid of that veil’s power—on ourselves and anyone else we may know.

 

  • A Recognition that Everyone’s Accomplishments Deserve to Be Celebrated

 

Even a few words of your dream language is something.

Your first conversation is a milestone you’ll remember.

Making a video of yourself speaking the language also deserves celebration.

Getting praise from native speakers and /or getting mistaken for one is also very noteworthy indeed.

No matter the language, every single one of these steps has to be savored and congratulated.

 

  • Being Intrigued by the Differences Between Nations and Cultures

 

This is one that sets apart those who speak three languages from those who speak 10+. They’re fascinated by what the world is like, what sort of surprises are present in the literatures, cultures, customs and traditions of the many languages of the world.

Those who get endlessly intrigued by this “world with little worlds” get thrown into a desire to endlessly explore, break comfort boundaries and do what it takes to acquire skills in many languages to degrees they can be proud of.

I find it no coincidence that my Polyglot Awakening occurred at a time in my life in which I shifted four countries over the course of four years.

 

  • A Love of Humanity in General

 

Even if they don’t agree with most governments on the face of the planet, all of my hyperglot friends realize that all of our human cultures deserve to be learned about, shared and loved.

The human soul, brain and heart are infinite beings. We will never realize the full extent of our own conscious, yet alone that of any one human being at any point in history.

Those who learn languages with great passion see in it the door into realizing how we as humans can all come together and realize exactly how much we have in common.

I’m drawing up a video in which I’m writing the script for (this is a scripted “inspirational video”) and I’m using one language I chose from each continent as well as … well, you’ll have to wait and see. Despite the fact that these languages come from completely different places in terms of climate, values and history, they still share so much.

And that’s the beauty of being alive right now…and being a polyglot (or an aspiring one) in the 2010’s and beyond.

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Is Fiji Hindi the Hardest Language I’ve Learned to Date? (And Resources to Learn Fiji Hindi)

While I’ve been doing some light studying of Fiji Hindi on and off since October 2017 on my YouTube channel, I only began studying Fiji Hindi in earnest about a week and a half ago, having made it my primary project for April 2018 given that I’ve become ever more comfortable with Fijian.

Yes, I’ve been getting significant pressure to focus more on Standard Hindi (mostly from people who know very little if not in fact nothing about Fiji), but Fiji Hindi it is, because it is the “language of the heart” concerning pretty much all Indo-Fijians. Standard Hindi may be useful but my first priority is ensuring that I can manage Fiji Hindi well enough (because pretty much nowhere else online have I encountered anyone doing what I’m doing with Fiji Hindi right now).

I’ve made four recordings in Fiji Hindi thus far for the 30-Day Speaking Challenge and already I’ve noticed a drastic improvement in me being able to put sentences together. That said, I still speak in a very simple manner and come NOWHERE CLOSE to being able to ask for directions / order things in restaurants using only Fiji Hindi.

The process of making those recordings, on the other hand, has been difficult for a number of reasons:

While Fiji Hindi is, from the perspective of linguistic concepts, not too difficult (Palauan and Greenlandic required a lot of mind-bending), from the perspective of resources it has been the most difficult language I’ve encountered.

At least with Fijian I had phrasebooks. With Palauan I had a good website (tekinged.com). With Kiribati / Gilbertese I had a good textbook as well as several thorough online dictionaries.

For Fiji Hindi, I’ve haven’t had as many materials that have significantly eased the process for me. There is the Glosbe Sentence dictionary, as well as the Live Lingua Project (look under Fijian for the Fiji Hindi Course!), not also to mention a series of good grammar books (available on Google) and an excellent Memrise Course.

Oh! And there’s Wikipedia available in Fiji Hindi as well (https://hif.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pahila_Panna).

For dictionaries, I use Glosbe’s sentence translations, the CTRL-F function on various books, and this dictionary which tends to be very clearly hit-or-miss (http://www.oocities.org/fijihindi/FijiHindiEnglishDict.htm). For verb conjugations there’s Wikiversity (from which I compiled this video walking you through the conjugations):

That said, a lot of these materials have been inconsistent in multiple ways (e.g. writing systems, the grammar book even uses the Devanagari script which even the Wikipedia [intended for native speakers] doesn’t use, the Peace Corps book uses upside-down e’s and the Memrise course doesn’t [and neither does the Wikipedia or the small bit of the Lonely Planet South Pacific Phrasebook devoted to Fiji Hindi]).

In a sense, this language has been very hard because even sculpting a SIMPLE SENTENCE can take multiple cross-references of all of these materials as well as using Google Search’s function to find out how legitimate (or not) a simple phrase is (to do this, use quotation marks to ensure that the EXACT combination of words you’re looking for exists somewhere. This can [and usually does] work even for languages with small internet presences!)

There’s also Fiji Indian TV (at http://www.fijiindiantv.com/ , with a lot of their videos hosted on YouTube) and the amount of English loan words used is staggering (and a friend of mine, Kevin Fei Sun of Bahasantara [https://medium.com/bahasantara] gave me fair warnings about how commonly they’re used even in Standard Hindi). I’ve been using this to ensure that my accent is…well…better…in some respect…because both in person and on YouTube I’ve had people telling me that I “sound like a white person” when I speak Fiji Hindi.

Maybe all I need is more effort and speaking practice invested in Fiji Hindi and the problem will “go away”. But if you’ve ever had this issue with Indo-Aryan Languages (regardless of what race you are), then do let me know! I’m always ready to hear inspiring stories!

After a week or two of recordings, I’ll set in place goals to ensure that I don’t have “gaps” in my Fiji Hindi vocabulary, much like I did with Fijian in February and March.

By the way, the March 2018 30-Days-of-Fijian recording WILL be up by next week!

This is the beginning of what promises to be a very exciting journey!

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Reflections on March 2018: Fijian, Lao and Starting Fiji Hindi – How Did I Do?

2018 is nearly a quarter-done and I could barely believe it given that it seemed as though only a few hours ago I was welcoming in the year by jumping off a chair, Danish-style.

After the pure euphoria that was the 2017 Polyglot Conference (and my presentation at it), I expected to rake in victory after victory this year, but so far I don’t think that it has happened. For one, I developed a partnership to develop “Nuuk Adventures” as soon as their new game comes out and it was postponed from January to April. I found myself losing a lot of motivation, burning out and just “wanting to take a break”—from game making, from language learning, pretty much everything, to be honest. I continue to feel detached and suspicious.

This month I had two challenges, one for Fijian and another for Lao. Fijian, no big surprise, made the largest share of gains. I feel that I could navigate my way around the countryside in Fiji without using English now. In a few days begins April, and then my focus will shift to Fiji Hindi with most of my efforts with Fijian focused on education and the Memrise course I’m working on.

With Fijian, every single one of my weak points has been significantly dealt with, in part because of a YouTube series that I made that you can watch here. I figured that if I were having trouble with some things, other learners of Fijian would as well:

The grammar I have practically mastered, thanks in part to the 30-Day Speaking Challenge when I successfully completed (I’ll post it during April).

I’ve noticed my pronunciation is better but I certainly don’t sound like a native speaker at all.

Lao was interesting. I devoted 30 minutes a day to it (much like I did Fijian, and often this resulted in later nights and earlier mornings). This included the following activities:

  • Actively listening to my YouTube Series:

 

 

  • Actively reading out loud phrases from my Lonely Planet Phrasebook (this time I got the Lao exclusive one and it has been going by very well, although some aspects of the proverbs mentioned in the blurbs still confuse me).

 

  • Listening to Lao music while walking on the street. (Look for “Lao Contemporary Music” in YouTube if you’re an absolute beginner, by the way!)

 

  • Teaching some phrases to my friends (especially people from East Asian countries such as China or South Korea that want to know why on earth Lao is my strongest East Asian Language—yes, now even stronger than Burmese, which I haven’t been putting effort into).

 

Am I fluent? No. Am I making progress? Yes, but I sidelined it because for April I’m focusing almost exclusively on Fiji Hindi as well as Fijian.

 

Already Fiji Hindi is opening doors for me, given that it is sometimes mutually exclusive with Hindi and Urdu. The differences between these languages also make for good conversation points. Sometimes I’ve been told that I “speak like a white guy” but above all most people with whom I have used it have been appreciative.

 

In addition to that I’ve now been learning about Indo-Fijian history, which makes me appreciate the overall Fijian story in a new light.

 

So goals for April:

 

  • 30 minutes a day on Fijian, focusing more on making my personal Memrise course.
  • 30 minutes a day on Fiji Hindi, focusing on the 30-Day Speaking Challenge and writing to my friends who speak standard Hindi.

 

I’m also ALWAYS open to the idea of finding more iTaukei (Indigenous Fijian) and Indo-Fijian music. So if you know anything you’d recommend, let me know!

April makes the third month of my 3-Month Fijian Challenge. I intend to make it a great one!

vosa vakaviti

Three Months of Fijian – Half-Way Reflection

In late January I heard that I might be spending the summer in Fiji (or, at least, a part of it).

As a result of being lightly disappointed with the fact that I put off studying Burmese until I got my visa to Myanmar for my Spring 2017 venture (something I should have NOT done, I should have begun studying Burmese as soon as the idea became entertained), I decided to do the opposite this time and invest in Fijian (and Fiji Hindi) as QUICKLY as possible, despite the fact that there is a possibility this trip may not happen at all.

One Lonely Planet book, many songs, and one-half of the 30-Day Speaking Challenge later, I find myself in a good place with Fijian, one that significantly surpassed what I was able to do with Burmese in May 2017.

Granted, part of this is likely due to the fact that (1) Fijian isn’t the first Austronesian language I’ve studied (I did some flirtation with Tongan in 2017 and committed myself to Gilbertese in January) (2) the fact that there is no new alphabet to learn and (3) the fact that there are more English loan words in Fijian than in many languages dissimilar to English.

Within the past week I’ve done away with my problems with numbers, leaving dates and time to be my biggest weak point, not also to mention getting vocabulary to “stick”.

I’ve also had issues in getting a steady stream of Fijian-language material.

For one, English is the lingua franca of Fiji (given that there are the iTaukei, the indigenous Fijians who speak “Na Vosa Vakaviti” as their first language, as well as the Fiji Indians who speak Fiji Hindi as their first language).

Second, SBS Australia (Special Broadcasting Service, in case you were curious) discontinued its Fijian-language programming last year, leaving me with the archives and nothing else.

Third, even on those broadcasts there sometimes is a significant portion of dialogue that can happen in English.

Fourth, it’s easier to find material from languages spoken in the developed world for too many reasons to count (The sheer rich variety of material in languages Finnish and German seemed to make their difficulty almost vanish, in a sense).

I’ve noticed that my accent in Fijian is getting better despite the fact that I’ve made no deliberate efforts to improve it. That said, I do have some issues with the r (which is rolled deliciously in Fijian). Another thing to keep in mind about Fijian pronunciation is the fact that the s is pronounced with extra spice. The word “boys” spoken by a Fijian speaking English would be pronounced like “boyce”.

My listening comprehension does need to improve (and I’ll go on recording say that Lao was the easiest dissimilar-from-English language to comprehend as a beginner. I honestly have no idea why.) Fijian, much like many other languages of Oceania, is spoken quickly although it did not leave me as “flattened” by its sheer speed the way that Gilbertese did. I have no intention on slowing down my audio but instead celebrating my small victories in listening to broadcasts (“Wow! I know what they’re talking about!”)

Where do I go from here?

My new CleartheList for Fijian:

– Dates and Time (new video coming soon, most likely!)
– Possessive suffixes and pronouns FULLY MASTERED
– Create Memrise Course with vocabulary from the Lonely Planet Phrasebook
– Get more music! (All music is appreciated!)

ALSO! Important for learners of Fijian! If you are looking for music, broadcasts, material, etc, don’t forget to use both “Fijian” in some searchs and “iTaukei” in others.

“iTaukei” literally means “indigenous”, and as a result of Fiji’s most recent constitutional changes it refers to the indigenous inhabitants of Fiji, whereas Fijian refers to all inhabitants of Fiji. Hence, Fiji Indians would be Fijians but not iTaukei.

(If you know anything about iTaukei / Findian relations, let me know!)

I’m so grateful I’ve decided to do this.

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But not so complicated it can’t be done, mind you!

Next week for Lee Morrow’s Project Polyglot, I’ll be presenting on a self-learning!

Read more about it / register here!