Cornish: Corny People? Cornland?

corny people edited

Up until half a year ago, I had no idea that there was such a thing as a Cornish Language, although after that point I found out that it was one of several languages in Europe (Livonian and Manx Gaelic also come to mind) that had passed to the point of extinction and had been revived).

No doubt my adventures on Crowdin, that have come to a temporary halt as a result of examinations and final papers, had spurred me into curiosity, which tends to attack me and bring me in odd directions in the most unpredictable of ways.

Chances are that you might not know what Cornish is, either, so allow me to explain.

About 1,000 years ago, if you were to look at a map of Britain (the Island that has England, Scotland and Wales on it, minus the minor Islands claimed by these countries), you’ll notice that Wales is not conquered by the English, and there is a comparatively small area below (a little peninsula that stretches out in the southwest of England) that wasn’t under English control either.

That is Cornwall, bordering Devon to the east, and it is one of the six Celtic Nations (the others being the Isle of Man, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, and Brittany [in France, below Cornwall]).

Cornwall (Kernow, as it is referred to in Cornish), had its own language that was in the same Celtic sub-family as Welsh and Breton (the language of Brittany).

One time before almost anyone alive on this planet now was even born, the last native Cornish speaker died, although in more modern times, the language was revived from texts (some have drawn a comparison to Modern Hebrew, which has had a lot of mythology surrounding it already).

And now the question comes, “how many people speak it?”

Perfectly, as in native? A few hundred, although there are many thousands more with a proficient command of a language, hell-bent on being warriors for the Cornish Language, like so many other movements for endangered languages.

I am reminded of this point of a Welsh proverb that says that a nation without a language is like a language without a soul, exactly the sort of mentality required for a linguistic revival of any sort.

So, here it comes. Cornish is my next language project, likely to replace Estonian on my list.

And here is another thing: there is a very specific reason that I am undertaking this Cornish Language project, and I cannot reveal it to you yet. But rest assured that it will be quite exciting indeed, if it materializes!

I’ll write more on the specifics of the Cornish Language in another post.

In the meanwhile, here is how some of my other projects are going:

  • I have mastered Greenlandic grammar. Two gargantuan tasks stand from fluency: (1) a mastery of every single suffix (the only comprehensive lists that exist are in Danish, and are resting in my DropBox account) and (2) a mastery of all essential vocabulary.

 

  • I’m still tied up with Icelandic and Faroese grammar and I’m self-conscious about both. Lord Forbid I actually have to look at tables and recite things out loud! Suffice it to say that I have a “carrot” for learning Icelandic that I will have to reveal at a later date, so I’ll use that as ample motivation…vocabulary with both is close enough to the other Germanic Languages that I’m not too intimidated by it.

 

  • On the other hand, Finnish and Northern Sami…well, if I don’t regularly maintain these then I’m going to forget both of them. There is a very real danger of this happening if I am poorly disciplined.

 

  • Portuguese has gotten a lot worse, Spanish a lot better, and Dutch a LOT I put it all up to living in New York City.

 

  • Swedish is in danger of slipping.

 

  • I really should be writing a paper that involves reading texts in German Gothic script. The good thing? That I’m almost done with it…

 

  • At least I don’t have to worry about my Hebrew exam anymore. Reflections on that course later, now that it is complete.

 

In the meantime, take the time to close the computer and get excited about something!

Polyglot Report Card for September 2014 (Part 3)

Part 2 is here: https://worldwithlittleworlds.wordpress.com/2014/08/31/polyglot-report-card-for-september-2014-part-2/

I had felt my interest for Northern Sami crash ever since I moved into New York about a week ago. That isn’t to say that I intend on forgetting everything, but that I am allocating my energy towards other projects at the moment.

There are a number of reasons for this. For one, I am quite irritated by Ođđasat’s excessive use of subtitles in languages other than Sami, although maybe there are shows in which it would be toned down. On the other hand, the relatively low number of speakers could also be a thing. Maybe I’ll get lucky in New York City and meet someone who speaks the language (not entirely unthinkable). Maybe one day I’ll get to Samiland (also possible).

For now, it seems that my goal with Northern Sami was to realize its connections to its culture and the other Nordic Languages.

sapmi

I feel that I have accomplished that, although it will definitely slip away without practice and I may find myself enchanted by the prospect of learning it very intensely yet again, as I had over the course over the past few months.

In contrast to Nothern Sami is Estonian, the rising star among my weakest languages.

eesti

I’m struggling with getting the past tense down, but certainly the idea that there is no true future tense in Estonian (or in any of the Finno-Ugric Languages) is a relief.

I expected the cases to be really easy after my Finnish venture had required me to master those ones, but “easy” barely exists in regards to learning any language at all. The plural declensions really trip me up, even now. On the plus side, I know that with enough flash cards and enough immersion these problems can go away.

Only during my last few days in Connecticut did I really master the “õ” sound, and if it weren’t for the songs in “Lumekuninganna ja Igavene Talv” (The Snow Queen and the Eternal Winter”…oh, what on earth could THAT be?), then I think I’d still have an issue with it.

Luckily it occurred to me that the sound wasn’t quite as nasal as I thought it was…

Listen for the words “Kas kõik on korras?” (is everything okay?) at around 1:17 to sample this mystifying phoneme:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-62nRWxOi0

Speaking of nasal vowels, it occurs to me that, thanks largely to Facebook and the time I spent in the country, my ability to forget elementary Polish leaves a lot to be desired (Saturday I went to the Columbia bookstore to browse and, of course, there was Polish spoken by a family there…)

polska polska

What also leaves a lot to be desired is my ability to improve. The reason? Because I’ve obviously been focusing on everything else. The only reason I haven’t forgotten absolutely everything (and I really wasn’t that good to begin with) is because of music, social media, and memories.

russkij flag

I literally have the exact same situation with Russian as well, which I considered forgotten until a friend of mine required some help in reading the Russian alphabet and some basics. Then it occurred to me that I hadn’t forgotten nearly as much as I had thought. But I don’t think I speak either of these remotely well, but maybe one day the passion will come back.

rf

French and Italian are going by well in Duolingo land, and I feel that I am on the cusp of getting basic conversational skills in Italian, but I’m nowhere near where I am with Brazilian Portuguese (whose tree I intend to finish first).

 

italia

On the other hand, I have been committing lots of time to learning Faroese vocabulary, but the accent still remains a bit of a problem, although the pronunciation less so. It feels like all of the Scandinavian Languages’ accents were thrown in a blender and out came a Faroese accent…no, really!

foroyar

There’s literally one thing that is holding me back from becoming conversational: the grammar. Right now I’m focusing on vocabulary, but once I get down the silliness with nouns and verbs, I may make extraordinary progress with Faroese and may quickly have it in the category of my linguistic “best buddies”. Once I reach that point, Icelandic won’t be too far behind. You can take my word for it!

Last but not least, Romansh. I’ve been pumping words into my brain with spaced repetition, and because of its similarity to the Romance Languages, this is easy for me. Putting together sentences? Getting the pronunciation perfect? I may need to buy a book for that…or, if I’m feeling particularly lazy, I could always visit www.rtr.ch

switzerland

True story: Romansh came up in a discussion I had this past Friday evening. And not at my own doing.

Anyhow, there may be languages learned, languages forgotten, and stasis in learning.

There will be mirth. There will be disappointments. There will be times when I feel very proud, and other times when I am tempted to throw phrasebooks or notebooks out the window (and not just notebooks with pages…).

But despite the pain, the self-consciousness, and the struggles, I’m glad I take these journeys. There are so many worlds opened to me as a result of them.

The report card is done!

So what am I waiting for?

Let new adventures begin!