All About the Burmese Language

My first Independence-Day Related post of 2018! (Well, discounting the shout-out to Slovakia I gave on New Year’s Day). Today is Burmese Independence Day and I thought it would be a good occasion to write about the language.

A year ago at around this time my parents were floating the idea of visiting Myanmar (Burma) after isolationist policies were relaxed. Interestingly they weren’t the only ones thinking this way—Sammy Samuels of “Myanmar Shalom”, a Jewish-Burmese Tourist Agency (YES, there are Burmese Jews, both in the country proper and abroad, and I’ve met BOTH!) described it as a “gold rush” when we met for the first time in May.

In a mall in Yangon that looked fancier beyond most malls in America, there were photographs of the country’s many minorities with captions about their lifestyles in Burmese and in English. My father told me that the underlying implication was that the wave of investors from China, the West and Myanmar’s immediate neighbors such as India and Thailand would threaten many aspects of local culture that remained unchanged during the years of military dictatorship.

Myanmar’s internal politics are labyrinthine and the ethnic diversity found in the country is similar to the situation that was present in the Americas before European colonization happened. (Fun Fact: Europe is the least linguistically diverse continent!)

It’s been more than half a year since I took off from Yangon and since then I’ve kept up my studies of Burmese on-and-off. It has proved to be one of the most difficult languages I have encountered by virtue of the fact that it is…different. (And Lao, for many reasons, I found significantly easier both to learn and to understand).

Here are some videos that I made about Burmese and my journey learning it last month. Sadly due to some circumstances I wasn’t able to complete the Eurolinguiste 30-Day Challenge but I’m glad I did what I did:

In any case, I turned to Polyglot Polls for potential topics to write about, and I got some topics that I’m not too qualified to write about, such as:

  • Burmese street slang
  • Tai-Kadai loan words in Burmese
  • Mon-Khmer loan words in Burmese

 

IF YOU KNOW about any of these topics in any capacity, PLEASE let me know about them in the comments.

One thing I really have noticed was the fact that, much like with languages like Yiddish, Uyghur and Tajik, Burmese takes a lot of words from a religious language, in the case, Pali, the language of Theravada Buddhism’s scriptures.

Burmese native words are one syllable each, and so expressions that have more than one syllable are usually of foreign origin. It goes without saying that words like “telephone” and “Internet” are detectable English loan words, as well as many names for countries and nationalities.

But one of the first things I had to learn in Burmese (as SOON as my visa got approved), was how to ask for only vegetarian food and the word that is used is သက်သတ်လွတ် (θɛʔ.θæʔ.luʔ). There were also some other things that pointed to foreign influence that was Indo-European but clearly not European, like the fact that the word for “name” is နာမည် (næɴmɛ), which is very similar to the English word “name” (it’s a Pali word.

Interestingly I notice that the patterns for liturgical-language loan words throughout the world are quite similar (and my observations tell me that they tend to skew towards nouns and higher registers of language).

But, here are some things you need to know about Burmese, whether you may be starting to learn it or want to learn a little bit or just want to read a list of facts:

  • No grammatical gender.

 

  • You put words at the end of a sentence in order to indicate what tense it is:

 

Tense Markers DONE

These will also be DIFFERENT depending on how formal (or not) the text (or spoken word) is. On inscriptions you’ll usually see formal variants. In phrasebooks, you’ll see informal.

 

 

  • Men and women will speak differently. My first day in Mandalay I went to a bank with my father and the servicewomen opened the door and told me “mingalaba SHIN” (the “shin” at the end is a “polite particle” used by women. For those unaware: it really doesn’t have a meaning, a bit like adding “sir” or “ma’am” at the end of sentences in English. I, as a man, would say “mingalaba khimya” (using a different polite particle). Also! Polite versions of “I” will be gendered as well. ကျွန်တော် (ʨənɔ) for men and ကျွန်မ (ʨəmá) for women.

 

 

  • You will also use classifier words as well. To say “I want coffee + 4” you would say “I want four cups of coffee”. To say “I want paper + 3” you would say “I want three sheets of paper”.

 

Here are some classifier words:

Category Words DONE

  • You can usually omit the subject of the sentence if it is implied. I remember one time I was talking to a Burmese taxi driver about Burmese music and I mentioned Chan Chan (described a musician who made her career off women’s broken hearts, in a sense). He said “very beautiful”, leaving it unclear as to whether it was the music OR the singer that he was talking about. Expect this commonly.

 

  • The tones are probably the trickiest out of any tonal language that I’ve encountered (with Mandarin probably having the easiest system, in my opinion). I’ll link to various sites that can help you better.

 

One website I would recommend is this below: provides a LOT of cultural information and provides steady information where a lot of other sites are lacking. Great for learning the Burmese script as well as tones and the finer points of language:

https://www.asiapearltravels.com/language/intro_burmese.php

Another resource I would recommend for getting a very basic level is Kenneth Wong’s playlist. He has one of the most soothing voices I’ve ever heard in my life:

Concerning books, Lonely Planet is also a good bet (when I first became enthused by Burmese in 2014, WAAAAY before I know that I would end up in the country and I honestly didn’t ever think I would end up there, they didn’t have the standalone Burmese phrasebook but now they do. I have the Southeast Asia one).

Also Reise Know How is pretty much always fantastic if you read German. In case of the Burmese one, the proceeds will go to funding children’s schools in rural Myanmar.

 

And as for USING it:

Burmese is very lively on the internet and when I was in the country I could see why. Even among some of the temples in Bagan which are crowded with homeless people, there were people using smartphones there.

What’s more, the Burmese-American communities are also noteworthy to point out (and the U.S. isn’t the only place that has these expatriate communities). They also have many ethnic minorities of Myanmar represented as well within these communities.

Burmese music is also fantastic especially when you consider the fact that, in some cases, it somewhat resembles Tom Lehrer’s confession as Lobachevsky (“Every chapter I stole from somewhere else”). Tons of Western, Chinese and Russian pop songs are covered in barely legal manners and translated into Burmese. A lot of the lyrics are also readily available embedded as subtitles in the video (so you’ll need the Burmese script for that!).

Some songs I’ve heard rendered into Burmese include “My Heart Will Go On”, ABBA, VIA Gra (Band from Ukraine popular in the Russian-speaking world), “A Million Voices” (that almost won Eurovision 2015), and many songs that I vaguely remember hearing in produce isles in the United States. (Confession: I know pathetically little about American popular music and, to be honest, I like it that way).

Anyhow, I’m happy to answer your questions or receive your expertise.

Above all, know that Asian Languages are not scary as you may make them out to be!

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Overwhelmed and Defeated: My Decision to Drop Out of the Burmese Challenge and What It Means

Happy Winter Solstice, everyone!

Speaking of darkness, I think today would be a good day to admit something:

Not everything goes right in my world.

A lot of people hear about me, see the MundoLingo stickers on my shirt, or otherwise get out of me the fact that I am a hyperpolyglot and assume that I have an “easy” time picking up new languages.

Well, with the exceptions of those very closely related to ones I know already, the answer is…no, I don’t have an easy time with it. I would venture that no one anywhere actually does. Usually, as was the case with some of my languages like Hebrew, Finnish and even Sierra Leone Krio earlier this year, it was a case of “doing something that you’re not very good at until you find yourself slowly leveling up until you’re reasonable and, then, eventually, very good”.

True, learning additional languages does enable you to detect patterns more easily and find uncanny similarities between even the most distant of languages (The Creoles I’ve studied and languages of Southeast Asia, I’ve noticed, share similarities in grammatical forms). But despite any advantages one may or may not have, it becomes an issue of grit and determination.

Alas, for my 30-Day Burmese Challenge too many things got in the way. The path to developing my video game required extra investment on my part. I felt as though a lot of the tasks in the last ten days were just too hard given my current level of Burmese. What’s more, I actually had a friend of mine die earlier this week.

That said, for January 2018 I will continue with a renewed plan keeping in mind “what I did wrong”.

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For one:

  • I may have overestimated my level of Burmese.
  • I may have overestimated what “willpower” alone can do.
  • I may have been affected by the seasons.
  • I may have been affected by transitions (a video game that I’ve tested is scheduled for a release in the near future).
  • I may have just chosen to do TOO MUCH.

That last point is important. The Lao project was a success because I felt that it was the right amount. With Greenlandic AND Burmese at the same time, I reached my breaking point. It would be one thing if one of them were a European Language with a lot of cognates to English and political power on the web. (I expect my January 2018 Hungarian challenge to be a LOT easier than anything I’ve done with my 30-day Challenges for non-Western languages thus far).

No one succeeds all of the time. If you think that someone is, you’re just looking at the surface.

I think the “beginning of the end” may have been when I watched a Burmese film with a lot of monk characters and I found myself unable to understand a lot of what was being said (by comparison, even with Lao which I had significantly LESS experience with, I was capable of understanding a good 30%, and for Greenlandic roughly a bit more).

Will I give up Burmese? Definitely not.

Am I glad I did this? Most certainly. AND I am likely to do the restaurant challenge next week AND put together the final video, most likely over the course of the weekend.

But I’m going to have to redo my plan for January 2018:

January 2018: Hungarian 30-Day Speaking Challenge. I think this will help a lot with my vocabulary gaps.

Also January 2018: Vincentian Creole 2-Week Challenge. Expose myself to Vincentian Creole (of St. Vincent and the Grenadines) every day from January 1st until January 14th. Then afterwards I’ll do one of the following:

  • Antiguan Creole for second half of January 2018
  • Grenadian Creole for second half of January 2018 (if I get the book)
  • Review Caribbean Creoles I already know well for the second half of January 2018 (Jamaican Patois, Trinidadian Creole and including Sierra Leone Creole as an honorary member).

Already I’m beginning to listen to Vincentian material every day during my commute. I’ll tell you more about it in another post. Although it has been interesting so far.

It’s been the first language I’ve been learning with literally NO resources for it that I can find. I’ve found religious materials for Christians and have been listening to them and NOTING the differences between Jamaican Patois and “Trini” to the best of my ability.

What’s more, the Grenada Market responded enthusiastically with my desire to find more materials to learn Grenadian Creole. Let’s hope I have luck.

Obviously in February and beyond I’ll turn my focus elsewhere other than Hungary and the Caribbean.

In the meantime, I’m drawing up an ambitious list of what I want done for 2018. And boy, will I dwarf every other year with what will happen!

May light be ever-present in your life!

Hungary and Vincy

How to Build Mental Discipline

One of my big goals for 2017 was to become more focused in my goals. Granted, in a sense, for all of us living in the developed world in the 21st century, it is getting both easier and harder. Easier because the maturity we have makes us focus more on what we really want as time goes by, and harder because the petite distractions seem to be multiplying.

A friend of mine, Naoki Watanabe, wanted me to write this post. He is a hero in many online language communities, having truly brought polyglots together from all throughout the world in online for on Facebook, not also to mention his admiration of many minority languages throughout the world. Also a fellow Hungarian enthusiast! (Congratulations on getting B1 in Hungarian, by the way!)

Let’s begin with rule 0 about building mental discipline.

Even if you don’t take steps to give yourself mental discipline now, you will grow into it eventually. Your mental discipline will get stronger with each new “milestone”. This could be getting degrees, passing a semester, completing projects, getting a new job or a raise, or any variety of transition.

However, 2017 was a good year for me in the respect that I am realizing that I have, more than ever, realized how mental discipline can be “hacked”.

Let’s hear some of my newfound revelations, shall we?

  • Use REALISTIC promises to bind you to your commitments. Post them in public places (such as your Facebook Status) or, if you come from a culture in which giving your word is binding (this could or could not be religious), say “If I don’t do X, then I will do Y” (where Y is a negative consequence).

 

In June 2017 I took it upon myself to learn Krio. Too much time spent with my family who lived in Sierra Leone, and it was important for me to connect to a culture that my parents were a part of. What’s more, given as it is almost certain that my parents will never return there, I will also get to see the face of the modern Sierra Leone (even if I don’t visit there, given the whole Internet thing).

I met my goal in being able to have conversations! I still have a long ways to go (it is currently my weakest Creole Language, with the Melanesian Creoles of Tok Pisin, Pijin and Bislama being my strongest).

I wouldn’t have been able to do that if I didn’t do this:

“30 minutes of Krio, in some way, every day. If you don’t, you have to delete your Facebook account” (!!!)

There was one time I sadly needed to walk away from a party that I really enjoyed so that I could go home and meet my quota. Cruel? Yes. But hey, I speak Krio.

Maybe not as well as I would like (my super-high standards get the best of me sometimes), but it’s not “a few words” or “a few sentences” it’s being able to speak it in a capacity that I would be able to navigate Sierra Leone without using Standard English much like I did in Greenland without using English.

 

  • Have an Ego

 

I have a bit of an “Ash Ketchum” complex when it comes to my life. I have this overwhelming desire to be the best and to let the world know. I had this understanding since I was seven years old that my life was going to be unique, that I was going to try everything, explore everything, and share everything with everybody.

In my 20’s I found out that there are a lot of people who will not put more effort into their life any more than they absolutely have to. Also there are a lot of people who will spend a lot of time talking about nothing, not exploring, nor on any great quest for self-improvement, much less wanting to “SHOW THE WORLD” anything.

I don’t understand people like these. But I think I may understand their vantage point.

I was raised with a strong idea, since early childhood, that I was the most brilliant person ever who HAD to use his gifts for something. A lot of people were raised with the idea that they were average, and that average was good, if not in fact preferable to being a “star”.

How does this tie to mental discipline?

You have to imagine yourself as the hero of your TV show, someone who people look up to and see as a role model.

Even if you’re not there, you will be. Try to tell yourself that!

Simply put, “if I don’t write this blog post about Bislama, I don’t see anyone else who will!”

I was fed this idea that I was and am a hero and that, if I am lazy, the world suffers. We all need that mindset.

 

  • IF you must take a break, do it in a way that will build value for other people.

 

Sometimes you have to watch TV, play a game or read something mindless.

In the mid-2010’s I discovered a way I could convert my “downtime” towards practicing my languages. Why use YouTube in English when I could do it in Norwegian? And even then, there are a lot of well-known YouTube channels that have fan-added subtitles in many other languages as well!

But if you need to play a game or watch some TV or what-have-you, feel free to transform it into something that other people can enjoy…what if you write about what you saw, like in a review, and then publish it on a blog? What if you record yourself playing the game with commentary instead? If you speak a language natively that isn’t English, could you contribute fan-made subtitles towards your favorite video?

You can’t be working all of the time, and I’m fully aware of that, but with some small tricks like these you can set yourself in a more productive headspace. And once you have these patterns locked into place, you’ll find the need to keep creating instead of spinning time away. And the world will be better off for it.

 

  • Be Aware of Emotional Traps Online

 

The corporate world wants to manipulate you and distract you from your goals. It also wants to toss your emotions into clicking and buying products.

Recognize when links are doing this to you, recognize when AUTHORS are doing this to you, and then tell yourself firmly. “I, (name), am above these forms of manipulation”. And don’t click on the video and/or link.

Sometimes I used to get worried about a lot of things (especially with last year’s US election). But interestingly now, I’ve learned to see patterns in which my emotions are being played with. If there’s clickbait of any variety, or any variety of manipulation any product pulls in order to get you invested, I imagine the announcer in the NYC subway system:

“If you drop something on the tracks, LEAVE IT”.

You’ll forget about whatever link you didn’t click on in a matter of hours. I can almost promise you that.

 

  • Imagine You are a World Champion or a World Champion To-Be

 

One time I significantly messed up leading a service at a synagogue when I was 13-14 years old. I was quite upset about it. But one of my friends told me afterwards that “you’re not Michael Jordan. The world expects the best from Michael Jordan. You’re just a kid”.

More than a decade later, I find myself that person who people expect the best of. And as a result, I can’t let them down. Even if I may have to at some times (such as the fact that I dashed away on the 30-Day Burmese Challenge yesterday on account of personal circumstances. I’ll still be doing the restaurant and the final video thing, though!), I realize that my overall behavior has to be that of a global role model.

Pretend you have that role, and then you’ll grow into it. Even if people doubt you have “what it takes” at first, you’ll sway (most of) them eventually with enough willpower.

 

 

EPILOGUE:

 

I also realize that there is such a thing as bad days, illnesses, and personal setbacks. Keep in mind that mental discipline isn’t something you need to have ABSOLUTELY all of the time, just most of the time. I know I couldn’t have possibly had mental discipline when I got Lyme Disease in November 2015. But your primary goal is to ensure that you have it on the AVERAGE day (most people usually have it on their good days, only).

Did you find this advice helpful? Let me know!

Here’s hoping that you, the Champion, can show the world just what a fantastic beacon to humanity you really are! Onwards!

2015-07-04 10.36.26

Turtle Pond in Austin, Texas

Month of Greenlandic / Burmese: 15 Days Left

 

Here we are with only a handful of weeks before a new year comes in, and looking back at 2017 it seems that I got a LOT of my goals dealt with accordingly (with the primary exception of reviving my comic book projects). The biggest victory that I made was, of course, choosing to revive this blog after it “went to sleep” after I got Lyme Disease in late 2015 until January 2017 (when I began writing posts again).

It seems that for 2018 I will need to make TWO lists, one for language-learning goals and the other for personal development goals outside of language learning. The first one, predictably, has pretty much already been decided on, and the biggest surprise is that I have a list of languages that I would seek to learn, one that would (pretty much) cover me for the rest of my life. I am likely to unveil it at some point this month or very early next year.

Anyhow, I’ve recorded myself speaking Greenlandic for 15 days now (about to make it 16) and have carried through successfully with the Burmese 30-day Challenge with Eurolinguiste (and the next fifteen days are proving to have tasks quite tough, so much so that I even considered giving up).

Anyhow, I’ll give some reflections for both before I upload a bunch of Gilbertese songs into my phone and actually have a meal.

 

Greenlandic

 

This challenge could really go in any direction, and I have a feeling that I’ll be reaping the full results of it after I gather the 30 recordings and put them in a video. Sometimes I’ve made some stupid mistakes (e.g. mixing up vowels at one point, and dreadfully mispronouncing a Danish-import “number” word). I think that once my native-speaker friends give me full feedback (and the video I’ll publish, probably as the last one this year, will be the means for them to do so), I’ll reach new heights.

Until then, I should say that the challenge actually really helped me put together new words in constructions that I could recognize passively and tell you about, but often I couldn’t use them with significant skill.

Am I glad I did this? Most definitely, although I think the prompts are significantly harder this time around (for some reason) and sometimes when I’ve had birthday parties, events or, as is the case now, Hannukah, then I’ll take “shortcuts” (I think one of my recordings was literally “I’m singing tonight and I have to practice my songs” and that was IT! I did this a few times in the Lao recordings but I don’t remember doing it as often)

I still have trouble with the “if” construction (hey, if any Greenlandic-speakers would like to help!), but aside from that it’s clear that I’ve memorized the grammar and all I really need to do now is keep on building vocabulary. What’s more (and this is something that I believe will remain a sticking point for the foreseeable future), I sometimes limit usage of my suffixes. Greenlandic native speakers usually put a lot more suffixes on their words than L2 Greenlandic speakers (e.g. Danes living in Greenland). Don’t really know how to get over that, and the fact that I was understood in Greenland without unleashing the full “suffix zoo” doesn’t really…fix things, because it means that I could continue with a simplified form. But maybe that’s okay for now.

My Greenlandic journey remains my hardest language to date, one in which, I feel, I have literally thrown EVERYTHING at it in order to stick (that is to say, that I have used WAY too many methods to learn the language), but still I struggle and it is nowhere NEAR being my strongest language, despite the fact that it and Gilbertese are my overall favorite languages in the world!)

Mother of the Sea and Me

Burmese

The biggest advantages I’ve had is the fact that, sometimes, I upload videos with the challenge and making those have been BY FAR the most helpful task I’ve had in helping me cement my memory of various words. The posts on this blog relevant to 30 Days of Burmese have also been helpful, too.

However, part of me worries that maybe I should have chosen a language that I spoke at a higher level instead.

Sometimes I find myself, much like with Greenlandic, using shortcuts, especially when I am busy (e.g. taking a silly question in Burmese that I found in the Tatoeba Sentence Database and posting it as my status to fulfill the “write a Facebook post” requirement. Normally I would write something original, but I was so drained that I just wasn’t up to it.)

On the other hand, I also find that this challenge is very much like the creative process, in the respect that often there are huge bursts of inspiration followed by mellow struggling.

Has it helped? Most definitely. Perhaps rote studying would have been more helpful given where I was with Burmese, but luckily I think that I should use this challenge in the future with languages that I study too much and don’t tend to USE as much. With Burmese, I’ve had the opposite situation. I’ve used it quite frequently (although in speech only) despite the fact that I never really STUDIED it in detail, aside from paging through grammar in books. It’s mostly been a process of phrase acquisition (much like how children learn languages), but also there are advantages to studying a language as well (given that it acts as a type of “polish”, which is evident from some of my videos in my Eurolinguiste playlist).

Category Words DONE

The true revelations and reflections will come at the end of the month. Stay tuned!

Label Items in my House in Burmese (Eurolinguiste 30-Day Challenge: Day 14)

Table – စားပွဲ (zəbwɛ̀)

Document – မှတ်တမ်း (m̥æʔ.tæ̀ɴ)

Book – စာအုပ် (sa.ouʔ)

Dictionary – အဘိဓာန် (əbídæɴ)

Mirror – ကြေးမုံ (ʨè.mouɴ) OR မှန် (m̥æɴ)

Bed – အိပ်ရာ (eiʔ.ya)

Bag – အိတ် (eiʔ)

Chair – ကုလားထိုင် (kələ.tʰaiɴ)

Telephone – တယ်လီဖုန်း  (tɛlipʰòuɴ)

Cards (to play with) – ဖဲ (pʰɛ̀)

Wallet (also purse) – ပိုက်ဆံအိတ် (paiʔsʰæɴ.eiʔ)

Coat (also jacket or raincoat) – မိုးကာ (mò.ɡa)

 

Do YOU know any more words that YOU think should be on this list? Share them with us!

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Some Burmese Expressions You Should Know (Eurolinguiste 30-Day Challenge: Day 13)

This is going to be a shorter post, haven’t done one of these since 2014 or so.

Anyhow, for Day 13 of the 30-Day Challenge (which I intend to do again next month with a different language), I have to “teach people some words”. I thought one very helpful thing to go through would be various words and expressions I thought amusing from throughout my learning materials.

I have a very useful Anki deck put together by André Müller, one of my linguistic role-models, Esperanto and Klingon Language fan, and someone who provides extremely useful and well-thought out opinions in the Polyglot online groups.

I found it a week before my trip to Mandalay was scheduled (for those of you who don’t know, Mandalay was the first stop on my journey). I wish I had discovered it sooner.

Anyhow, here are some useful expressions, from that deck to give you some idea of how the language words…differently…than others throughout the world.

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ညနေ (ngá.ne) – this word means “evening” but it actually means “afternoon sun”. I think that one reason for this (thinking back to my time at Inle Lake) is that the sun actually becomes visible rather than white-ball-that-will-permanently-damage-your-eyesight right around the evening. Interestingly Irish has a word that refers to both evening and afternoon (tráthnóna). Come to think of it, the skies in rural Ireland and rural Myanmar do…resemble each other…in some respects.

စိတ်ပူ (seiʔ pu) – this means “worry” (verb) but it actually means “heart hot”, or, more accurately, this anxious feeling that your heart is actually boiling due to any number of things. This idiom perfectly captures many types of fright that are all too common in the human experience. There’s another idiom referring to worry and that would be…

အားငယ် (à ngeh) – this means “having weak strength”. The idea that having a worry is something that actually eats your strength away is something that I can’t believe I hadn’t noticed until I came across an idiom like this. Again this shows the value in learning languages, because some of the new idiomatic perspectives offered by other tongues are very helpful in making you relate to other people, situations, experiences and problems.

နားလည် (nà leh) – one of my first Burmese expressions that I ever learned (the first thing I did to learn Burmese was actually to download the Colloquial Burmese audio. I didn’t end up buying the book because I thought it would be too big for me to carry around, although I did have two other books, though) It actually means “ear going around”! This means that, in order to say “I understand” you would literally say “my ear is going in circles”, and similarly to say “I don’t understand” you would say “my ear isn’t going in circles”.

အသည်းယား (əthèh yà) – to feel disgusted, but it actually means “having an itch of the liver”. The next time I have that sensation I’ll definitely keep that in mind. Although it’s not a moment I’m looking forward to…

အသည်းကွဲ (əthèh kwèh) – in other languages, we have broken hearts, in Burmese, we have split livers.

ဈေးချို (zè tsho) – the word for “cheap” in Burmese actually translates to “having a sweet price” or “sweetly priced”. For some odd reason I can’t help but think of American slang when I read this. Similarly to be expensive is ဈေးကြီး  (zè tshì) – meaning “greatly priced”.

Tomorrow’s task for Day 14 is labeling items in my house. This. Should. Be. Fun.

Eurolinguiste.com 30-Day Challenge Day 1 – Basic Burmese Language Infographics

Ideally this should be on Pinterest but my files were too big to fit, and so they’re going here. I sorta like them here anyhow.

You can read more about the challenge on http://eurolinguiste.com/challenge/

Category Words DONE

Days of the Week DONE

Rando stuff DONE

Tense Markers DONE