Some Burmese Expressions You Should Know (Eurolinguiste 30-Day Challenge: Day 13)

This is going to be a shorter post, haven’t done one of these since 2014 or so.

Anyhow, for Day 13 of the 30-Day Challenge (which I intend to do again next month with a different language), I have to “teach people some words”. I thought one very helpful thing to go through would be various words and expressions I thought amusing from throughout my learning materials.

I have a very useful Anki deck put together by André Müller, one of my linguistic role-models, Esperanto and Klingon Language fan, and someone who provides extremely useful and well-thought out opinions in the Polyglot online groups.

I found it a week before my trip to Mandalay was scheduled (for those of you who don’t know, Mandalay was the first stop on my journey). I wish I had discovered it sooner.

Anyhow, here are some useful expressions, from that deck to give you some idea of how the language words…differently…than others throughout the world.

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ညနေ (ngá.ne) – this word means “evening” but it actually means “afternoon sun”. I think that one reason for this (thinking back to my time at Inle Lake) is that the sun actually becomes visible rather than white-ball-that-will-permanently-damage-your-eyesight right around the evening. Interestingly Irish has a word that refers to both evening and afternoon (tráthnóna). Come to think of it, the skies in rural Ireland and rural Myanmar do…resemble each other…in some respects.

စိတ်ပူ (seiʔ pu) – this means “worry” (verb) but it actually means “heart hot”, or, more accurately, this anxious feeling that your heart is actually boiling due to any number of things. This idiom perfectly captures many types of fright that are all too common in the human experience. There’s another idiom referring to worry and that would be…

အားငယ် (à ngeh) – this means “having weak strength”. The idea that having a worry is something that actually eats your strength away is something that I can’t believe I hadn’t noticed until I came across an idiom like this. Again this shows the value in learning languages, because some of the new idiomatic perspectives offered by other tongues are very helpful in making you relate to other people, situations, experiences and problems.

နားလည် (nà leh) – one of my first Burmese expressions that I ever learned (the first thing I did to learn Burmese was actually to download the Colloquial Burmese audio. I didn’t end up buying the book because I thought it would be too big for me to carry around, although I did have two other books, though) It actually means “ear going around”! This means that, in order to say “I understand” you would literally say “my ear is going in circles”, and similarly to say “I don’t understand” you would say “my ear isn’t going in circles”.

အသည်းယား (əthèh yà) – to feel disgusted, but it actually means “having an itch of the liver”. The next time I have that sensation I’ll definitely keep that in mind. Although it’s not a moment I’m looking forward to…

အသည်းကွဲ (əthèh kwèh) – in other languages, we have broken hearts, in Burmese, we have split livers.

ဈေးချို (zè tsho) – the word for “cheap” in Burmese actually translates to “having a sweet price” or “sweetly priced”. For some odd reason I can’t help but think of American slang when I read this. Similarly to be expensive is ဈေးကြီး  (zè tshì) – meaning “greatly priced”.

Tomorrow’s task for Day 14 is labeling items in my house. This. Should. Be. Fun.

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